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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
out there are typically democratic blue-collar working-class men and women, roman catholic in religion -- certainly not all of them, and pro-union. these were the quintessential reagan democrats. they were in counties adjacent to pittsburgh like beaver and westmorland and washington and corrine and further to the east -- kim-shree and fayette. those counties have a propensity to vote republican, particularly in the elections. they are culturally conservative, pro-gun, pro-life, not particularly fond of gay- rights. then think of pennsylvania, draw a big t up the center of the state, fanned out across the new york border, not quite getting to erie or the northeastern part of the state, the big t -- that is the conservative area of the state. basically white, protestant, does not have a definable ethnic group in particular. once you get east of the susquehanna river, with the exception of a few counties, the demography changed sharply. let's get down to southeast -- philadelphia, heavily democratic -- democratic, but the suburban counties, and montgomery, chester, delaware, the swing tow
protector of freedom of religion and speech after making that movie. i saw how some of the family and kids were ridiculed. thank god it wasn't today because it was really pre-twitter and all of that. i was really alarmed by some reactions to be honest with you. we hadn't really expected that. host: what documentaries? what's the motivation? how much of it is a business versus you just like this medium? guest: it's a terrible business to be in. if i was financially motivated, i would be doing something like reality television, god forbid. no one gets into documentary motivated by the business allure or the financial allure. although, we do make a fine living at it. but, really, it's rachael and my co-director and i, we share an incredible curiosity to learn and it's incredible gift that we're giving to be able to pick up the phone, knock on someone's door, go to someone's community and say hi. please talk to me because i'm trying to tell this story. we ended up meeting people and experiencing things that most people never will. we never would. part of it's a little bit selfish because you
heretical they couldn't even imagine really the key not it is a common religion. the father of bashar al-assad had a muslim religious practice in order to become president of syria. they are quite far apart. but they share common ideology. syria has supported iran during the iran-iraq war because they hated iraq at that time. syria and iran share anti-americanism and the israeli attitude don't want a domination of architecture in terms of security of the region. so that's the shia crescent. the second is a growing sunni crescent but they still lack the pinch. this is saudi arabia's game. the crescent goes from libya for each of i'm too jourdan through the southern part of the western part of iraq and onto saudi arabia and down to the coast that i called the oil gold coast. we see selassie fighters, moving from libya and across saudi arabia, to iraq and into syria increasingly to join the victorian water. the opposition in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremist forces, which is one of the reasons it's so difficult for us to support them. saudi arabia and qatar are providing
to their guns and religion, the kind of white working-class workers that the president is having the most trouble connecting with. the obama campaign is advertising as well. they have a turnout machine in philadelphia. pacs don't want the obama campaign to gin up their turnout machine. i think that machine will start to get engaged and that machine will drive president obama's margin down there. that's in southeastern pennsylvania. host: we're talking about an october surprise in campaign 2012 and the history of it. this on twitter -- guest: she's probably right. many people aboard a voted. there is 1 weeks ago. the average american is paying attention to something other than politics, whether it's their own economic situation or recovering from storm damage in a swing state like virginia or new hampshire. -- many people have voted already. ballistics of trying to get around the place after a storm can be a real problem -- the logistics. it's not like either of these guys will have a game changer. the next couple days will be focused on not doing something stupid around the hurricane and
religion. >> i'm not catholic. i am an episcopalian. i cannot answer that question. my husband is a catholic. we have raised our children as catholics. i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. it should be safe, legal, and repair. >> here is a valid point that is constructed. we have babies in america and i would that are being aborted simply because they are little baby girls, because the mother wants a boy instead of a girl. we have legislation before congress that prohibits sex selective abortion. she thinks it is ridiculous to talk about it. i think it matters to the little girls are being aborted. >> election day is one week away. >> i like watching the gavel-to- gavel coverage. it is the only place to get the real deal. i also enjoy news makers and the book programs. i like that the commentary is only intended to let you know what is going on. there is not too much analysis. opinion.rtainly is i appreciate all i can see through it and understand ithe programming itself. i can get my analysis elsewhere. if you want to see how your government works directly, c- s
a question. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by your religion? >> i am not catholic. i am an episcopalian. i cannot answer that question. my husband is a catholic. my children are catholic. my grandchildren have just been baptized in a catholic church. we raise our children as catholics. i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view on abortion is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. >> here is a point that is constructive and a difference between us. we have babies and america and in iowa that are being avoided simply because they are baby girls, because the mother wants a baby boy instead of a baby girl. we have evidence. we have legislation before congress that prohibits sex- selective abortions. i think it matters. it matters to the little girls who are being aborted. >> election day is one week away. find a key house senate races across the country on c-span, c- span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, a look at color model as a battleground state in the 2012 election. an update on the presidential race in that state. this is 25 minutes. host: all t
whether they get to eat. religion is banned. there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment, punishment, i should add, that is often needed out to the three generations of a person's family , and political offenders knows that when he goes to present his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag, and more than a million, perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans to have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best efforts of the family regime to keep it secret. for more than 50 years, ever since the end of the korean war, north korea has been sealed off from the world's eyes. the family regime has pursued an isolationist policy and it maintains an iron grip on information, access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government, and its style mu
, as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by religion? >> i am episcapalian. my husband is a cathlic, my children are catholics. we raise our children as catholics. i am happy to talk about my view on abortion. it is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. i've worked hard on the rare part, because i wanted to make sure this is not just something that divides us politically, and that i would work to make sure we reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and helped unemployed men and women get a job. i work with an organization that does research and now has the beginning evidence to show that we have reduced the number of abortions in iowa by 26% and unintended pregnancies by 8%. i have been in washington talking about the results of this and we hope that this will be a model for the nation. about't have to talk abortion if we make sure that people have access to contraceptives. i would like congressman king to explain what his view is on that. he has said that -- i would like to know if he believes that women in this community have the right to -- the legal right to
really looking at it as a common religion. they are quite far along. syria and iran share americanism and the anti-israeli attitude. they share a common front. the shia crescent is there. and the growing [inaudible] the crescent goes from libya through egypt through georgia and the western part of iran and saudi arabia and the coast. moving across saudi arabia. increasingly the joint of sectarian war. the optimism in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremists. it is one of the reasons for supporting bad, saudi arabia is providing small arms. and we have to ask ourselves, what kind of extremism is coming out of that? >> we also have a situation of that which is maintained by russia. again, that group -- it goes back again. all relationships between russia and syria. they are both against the security council and it has to do with a great power in war over there. there is the issue of what issue is that that they are actually supporting? i have a syrian contact that i talked to a couple of days and he said syria? we think of ourselves as [inaudible] , but we do not know what
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
to the vice- presidential candidates. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by religion? >> i am not catholic. i am episcopalian. my husband is catholic. my children are catholic. my grandchildren have been baptized in the catholic church. but i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view is that it can be safe, legal, and rare. >> a valid point, it is a difference between us that is not manufactured. we have babies in america and and i love being aborted simply because they are little baby girls. the mother once a boy instead of a girl. it is coming from the asian community as well. with legislation that prohibits sex-selective abortion, she thinks is ridiculous to talk about and i think it matters to the little girls that are being aborted. >> find key senate races across the country on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org/ campaign2012. >> in 30 minutes, a discussion on the future of the news industry, including investigative reporting and collaborative journalism. hurricane sandy is to blame for at least 48 deaths. more than 8 million people without pow
recounts his life in fractalist. in of africa, africa's culture, religion, history and identity. look for these titles in bookstores this coming we can watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> could have wanted more but in the conference can only do so much so want diversity. you want democrats, republicans, different parts of the country. everyone at different ages. we knew on the basis of nine, you can't make generalizations that are 100% certain. we may say as much in the book because conclusions are hypothesis that other people might run with but in order to make those hypotheses we needed a fairly diverse group. >> we also have the white house project for the last couple election cycles and several of the women identified several years before the 2008 election, kathleen sibelius, both in there, and barbara lee has been here several years from now when you did the last round with her foundation and talked about looking at women governors. we wanted to look at women governors who had been through barbara lee's training through the pipeline. we also m
-presidential candidate. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion issue by your religion? i am in the past billion. i guess i can't answer that question. my husband is a catholic, i'm an episcopalian. my grandchildren have been baptized in the catholic church and we have been raised as catholics, but i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view is it should be safe, legal, and rare. >> here is a valid point that is constructive and is a difference that is not manufactured -- we have babies in america and in iowa being aborted simply because they are little baby girls because the mother want a boy instead of a girl. we have evidence coming in on that from the asian community. of legislation prohibiting sex- selecting abortion. i think it matters and i think it matters to the liberals being aborted. >> follow races from across the country on c-span, c-span radio and on line. >> the house and senate came in a short time ago for a brief pro forma session but no legislative business. aside from that, the federal government remained closed today. hurricane sandy blue through overnight. presi
for it. why should i pay for their birth control? it is against my faith. i have the freedom of religion and plan to exercise that by voting for romney. host: kathy sullivan. guest: in the first place, no one is proposing that taxpayers pay for someone's birth control. the issue is whether or not the employer has the right to discriminate against certain types of prescriptions, specifically birth control. this is a law we have had in new hampshire for several years now that employers have to cover prescription contraceptive. it has worked quite well. it has nothing to do with the tax payer. it is the expense of the employer, not the taxpayer. with respect to the health-care issue, i have to tell you something, i am the managing partner of a law firm. we have about 50 people who work there. up until couple of years ago, our health and --ealth insurance premiums went up by double-digit numbers. for years. last year our health care premiums will ve gone up by only 3% total for two years, which is unheard of several years ago. we kept looking at the double- digit percentage increases. i am v
the children of god that we know how this country is. host: take us through the religion to the election. guest: i will do that if you allow me to complete my comments. host: go ahead. caller: this country is based on so-called christianity. i will tell you this, if they choose mitt romney, who believed that jesus was not borne by the holy spirit -- host: we are going to save the religious lesson for another day. on the republican line, chris, your review on at the election in the state of new york. caller: i feel very lonely as a republican in new york. i would like to make comments on michael bloomberg. you referred to him as governor bloomberg, he is the mayor. it is focused on climate change. mr. bloomberg is supposed to be a business expert. it says nothing about the future of this country under president obama's second administration. and something else about michael bloomberg. staten island is in ruins. one-third of manhattan is without power for five days. he will have the new york city marathon start in staten island and run throughout the five boroughs through the midst of devastation
at the role religion is playing in the campaign 2012 and how the latest voted blocks might impact the election. turn your clocks back one hour tonight. that is it for "washington journal." a new edition comes at 7:00 tomorrow morning. >> through the election day, what our coverage of the presidential candidates and key senate and house and governor races. after an overview of the 2012 senate races, we will show you the maine senate race debate. >> a senior analyst for the rothenberg her campaign has completely retooled. she reinvents herself. she has had some good television ads. murphy is making up the advantage where it needs to be. she is open a case like, but not a huge leak that democrats would like in connecticut. -- lee that democrats would like in connecticut -- lead that democrats would like in connecticut. north dakota is an interesting one. it is one that if democrats have not gotten the right candidate, we would not be talking about it being as competitive. the democrat gets rave reviews on the trail. burke found himself under water for a bruising campaign for the house. he had to
that i thought was guaranteed under the constitution, the practice of your religion, that now there has to be an amendment put forward to bring that about. if the law was never passed, the lawsuit wouldn't be in place, and religious freedom, today, would not be in question. >> moderator: continuing with rebuttals, mr. horning, 30 seconds. horning: there's a lot of misunderstanding, and there's no real winning the issue. unfortunately, it's one of those that, you know, it's an outcome of something terrible happening sometimes, and it's dealing with life situation nobody wants. we can't do justice to it. as a federal legislature, i can't do justice to it. i would fail in what i would try to achieve. >> moderator: thank you. mr. donnelly? donnelly: my faith guided me on the issue, and i know their faiths have guided my friends who are up here as well. we have a program in my town called the women's care center. what they do is provide a positiontive alternative. for women who are pregnant, there's an opportunity for a place to live, a place to be cared for, and for somebody to know there's
state. people aren't slaves of the kim family regime. they control even if they get to eat. religion, and no rule of law , percy political infractions are met with harsh 10-- punishment meted out three generations of political fender knows when he goes to present his parents and his children will pare -- probably go with him. there are 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag may be as high as 2 million have already died. the reason reno this and much more is the testimony of those who have escaped for the these are the people i write about in my book this comes despite the regime broke to keep it secret. north korea has been not from the world's eyes. the regime has pursued the isolationist policy and has an iron grip want access on which is strictly controlled. to give one example every radio must be registered and the dial must be fixed to the government-run radio station. security police equipped with scanners tried to identify households where residents have tinkered with the radio and tuning in to foreign broadcast. surveys of north koreans hiding in china show a high percentag
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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